Porsche Social Media Backbone of its Digital Strategy

For Porsche social media is not just an additional tool in order to connect to online-savvy audiences, it’s the backbone of their online strategy

Porsche is mining the always-on sensibilities of social media to encourage fans to share and consume content from one integrated platform, which is www.porsche.com . Porsche is using content curation tool Storystream to steer this efforts, building microsites that give fans a holistic view of what’s being said about certain car launches of campaigns worldwide.

Porsche Social Media Backbone of its Digital Strategy“We do not believe in a linear progression through a virtual funnel, but recognise that each customer chooses their individual path to form a purchase decision. We thus believe that Porsche must understand the specific needs of the customer in his individual situation and listen to signals he/she is sending in order to cater the right content at the right point in time. In order to work in this context, every bit of content needs to be responsive,” Porche’s digital marketing and dialogue manager and Deniz Keskin told The Drum.

To accelerate the plan, Porsche is encouraging its agencies and ad tech vendors to get tighter to companies like Google, Facebook and Twitter in order to create content that fuels business goals. It’s an approach the car maker tries to balance with what it hopes are more agile ways of working directly with its marketing partners so that it can respond to communication challenges.

“Social media is more than an efficient and speedy way of communicating to a (primarily) younger target group. As a luxury manufacturer, we see more and more of our actual customers in that space,” said Keskin. The discipline is used to hit three key goals; building additional awareness for Porsche’s communications, amplifying the conversation around through brand ambassadors and listening to conversations that could become early signals for business issues.

“This is why we regard Social Media not only as an additional tool in order to connect to online-savvy audiences, but as the backbone of our online strategy,” said Keskin.

Read more

Brilliant Social Media Campaign Saves Library

Great success story, how the people of Troy MI used a brilliant social media campaign to save their library

Brilliant_Social_Media_Campaign_Saves_Library

The  folks of Troy, Michigan were in a bit of a financial bind. They wanted to pass a small tax to help pay to keep the library open. This, being a tax increase, brought Tea Party activists out in droves.

The Tea Party activists rallied against any increase in taxes successfully changing the conversation away from protecting the library to just talking about taxes.

The library looks as though it was certain to go under.

That’s when the people who supported the library and wanted to see it stay open had to find a strategy to bring the conversation back to the library, books and reading.  One problem though, they had little financial means to do that.  that’s when they turned to a mix of grass root and a brilliant social media campaign to turn things around and win by a landslide

Watch their social media campaign video

Publishing Unapproved Campaigns Could Get You Fired

Publishing Unapproved Campaigns Could Get You FiredYou may have created the campaign, it may not have been approved by the client but he still owns it and posting it to showcase your work without the client’s approval could put your agency in a tough spot and could get you fired

Call it friendly fire. An agency art director posts an unsanctioned version of a TV ad for a client on his personal website to enhance his portfolio. It was the cut he worked on and fought for—even if that particular version didn’t make the cut.

The problem is, he doesn’t own the work, and neither does his agency. The clip belongs to the client, making the art director guilty of copyright infringement.

It’s a scenario that’s become all too familiar at agencies. Copyrighted content routinely finds its way online, as creatives aim to burnish their own brands as much as the brands for which they work. But too often, career aspirations clash with a marketer’s need to protect its intellectual property. Clients pay agencies hefty fees and, naturally, expect loyalty rather than an art director going rogue.

Creative chiefs attempt to prevent such digital dustups, though clearly they can’t police everyone all the time. So, they have taken to schooling employees on the importance of protecting the client’s property—stressing that their very job security is at stake.

Posting work without permission can land not just employees but also their employers and even the client in hot water. Ford was forced to apologize in 2013 after a creative team at JWT India posted spec posters that never ran, including one that featured an illustration of the Kardashian sisters tied up and gagged in the trunk of a Ford Figo. The copy read: “Leave your worries behind with Figo’s extra-large boot.” The piece ended up on the blog Ads of the World and sparked a public backlash.

Learn more

FTC Social Media Endorsements Guidelines

FTC endorsements guidelinesEndorsements and reviews are big in social media, they can be effective decision making tools for consumers if they are truthful.  the FTC published endorsement guidelines to help brands and businesses stay out of trouble

Suppose you meet someone who tells you about a great new product. She tells you it performs wonderfully and offers fantastic new features that nobody else has. Would that recommendation factor into your decision to buy the product? Probably.

Now suppose the person works for the company that sells the product – or has been paid by the company to tout the product. Would you want to know that when you’re evaluating the endorser’s glowing recommendation? You bet. That common-sense premise is at the heart of the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) Endorsement Guides.

The Guides, at their core, reflect the basic truth-in-advertising principle that endorsements must be honest and not misleading. An endorsement must reflect the honest opinion of the endorser and can’t be used to make a claim that the product’s marketer couldn’t legally make. Continue reading

Retailers Are Turning to Social Media For Market Research

Social media often overlooked for market researchSocial media permeates every facets of business, from branding to marketing, sales, customer service and to often overlooked market research, product development and HR

Increasingly though, retailers and brands are turning to social media for market research.

Consumers have adopted social media in a massive way and, in spite of concerns for privacy, are sharing what they like, buy and want on platforms like Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram to name the biggest ones. Continue reading

Is Your Website Mobile Friendly?

Is your website mobile friendlyIs your website mobile friendly or not, if it is not, you will want to know about April 21st

We’ve all heard and laughed at Geico’s commercial “Do you know what day it is”, April 21st is not hump day but if your website is not responsive (aka friendly to mobile devices like smart phones, I pads and other tablets) it’s the day Google will start penalize your rankings Continue reading

FDA Cracking Down on Facebook Marketing

FDA craking down on FacebookThe FDA cracking down on Facebook marketing is a clear signal that companies have to treat Facebook the same way they would treat any other media they use in their communication with the public

In the past 6 months the FDA has issued 6 warning letters mostly for unapproved claims but when it comes to unapproved claims social media creates a unique challenge for companies in the healthcare industry at large (that includes manufacturers and distributors of supplements and other products not usually considered drugs or medical devices but could be construed as related to health) in that comments posted by third parties can also be construed as claims and the simple fact of liking a comment constitutes an endorsement of the claim by the owner of the page Continue reading