Facebook or LinkedIn? Most Used Social Media Network For Business

Facebook or LinkedIn, which network is the most used social media network for business, the debate has been going on for years and users debating the pros and cons of both platforms usually coming to the conclusion that Facebook is most used for B2C and LinkedIn for B2B but what does the data tell us?

The 2015 Social Media Marketing Industry Reportbased on data from a survey of 3,720 marketers; 61% of survey participants focus primarily on attracting consumers (B2C), and the other 39% primarily target businesses (B2B) sheds some light

Most used social media platforms

Of all platforms, it should not be surprising that Facebook is the most used social network for business overall (93% ) vs Twitter (79%) and LinkedIn (71%).

Most Used Social Media Network For BusinessThis can be explained by the sheer number of Facebook users vs Twitter and LinkedIn.  Facebook has 1.44 billion monthly active users vs LinkedIn 380 million users and Twitter 304 million (2015 with Facebook spending on average 42 minutes per day on the site vs 9.8 minutes on LinkedIn Continue reading

Brilliant Social Media Campaign Saves Library

Great success story, how the people of Troy MI used a brilliant social media campaign to save their library

Brilliant_Social_Media_Campaign_Saves_Library

The  folks of Troy, Michigan were in a bit of a financial bind. They wanted to pass a small tax to help pay to keep the library open. This, being a tax increase, brought Tea Party activists out in droves.

The Tea Party activists rallied against any increase in taxes successfully changing the conversation away from protecting the library to just talking about taxes.

The library looks as though it was certain to go under.

That’s when the people who supported the library and wanted to see it stay open had to find a strategy to bring the conversation back to the library, books and reading.  One problem though, they had little financial means to do that.  that’s when they turned to a mix of grass root and a brilliant social media campaign to turn things around and win by a landslide

Watch their social media campaign video

Hashtags: Useful or Nuisance?

Are hashtags obsoleteWe have all seen them, use them or been annoyed by them when abused, something I call hashtag vomit.  Users who don’t understand hashtags tagging their post with so many irrelevant and annoying hashtags you just want to move on without reading the post.

It started on Twitter, Facebook unsuccessfully tried to incorporate them in posts, LinkedIn gave up on them, Instagram and Pinterest users swear by them but few actually understand their use and purpose.

By definition, A hashtag is a type of label used on social network and micro blogging platforms to make it easier for users to find messages with a specific theme or content. In short, hashtags are like keywords allowing readers to find content related to a subject and should be treated as such

Social media “gurus” have been promoting hashtags as essential to social media posts and content success, advising marketers to use hashtags as a critical  element of any high-performing social media update without educating their clients and the public about the way to effectively use them

The result has been hashtag vomit, what mainstream search engines would classify as spam.  We have seen updates and content with plethora of hashtags, some relevant most irrelevant for the sake of trying to maximize potential exposure.

The question has long been,  do hashtags actually work?

The answer is yes and no, depending on your purpose

Twitter recently released a study focused on direct response ads, which are intended to drive a specific result, like an app install or a website visit, suggesting that when these ads included a hashtag or mentioned another account, they didn’t perform well

Continue reading

Politicians Idiot Guide To Twitter

idiot guide to Twitter8 years into the making, British members of parliaments were just issued an “idiot guide to Twitter” or, how to tweet without how to avoid being boring, pompous or sued.

The “idiot guide to Twitter” guide contains pearls of wisdom… or just some common sense advice to a real time communication tool like Twitter that can be extended to any social media platform.

  • Always tell the truth
  • Do not tweet while drunk
  • Only tweet when  ‘when you have something interesting or worthwhile to say’
  • Adopt a ’60-second rule’ before posting anything online, composing a message but then waiting ‘one minute before pressing the tweet button’.
  • Tweet about ‘almost anything’, including a mix constituency work, parliamentary activity and their personal life.
  • Tweet about things normal people are interested in like music, sport, films and TV. ‘But make it genuine, don’t fake an interest in your local football team or Coronation Street if that’s not your thing.’
  • It isn’t good practice to constantly retweet tweets that praise you, or even to sarcastically retweet tweets that criticise you. It is too aggrandising and pompous.’
  • Instead, favourite every tweet where someone says something nice or positive about you
  • Tweet yourself and be yourself, your team can help you, but can’t do it for you
  • Talk less than you listen
  • Tools make it easier and more effective
  • Tweets should never be deleted
  • Hashtags improve engagement, but should be used sparingly
  • Lists save you time
  • Your views aren’t your own
  • Photos and video make it more interesting

The “idiot guide to Twitter” was produced for Parliament by the Chartered Institute of Public Relations and officials stated that it had not cost any money to the tax payer

What do you think…  chime in in the comment section

 

Retailers Are Turning to Social Media For Market Research

Social media often overlooked for market researchSocial media permeates every facets of business, from branding to marketing, sales, customer service and to often overlooked market research, product development and HR

Increasingly though, retailers and brands are turning to social media for market research.

Consumers have adopted social media in a massive way and, in spite of concerns for privacy, are sharing what they like, buy and want on platforms like Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram to name the biggest ones. Continue reading

Facebook Hides User Comments On Business Pages

Facebook Hides User CommentsFacebook hides user comments on business page to cozy up with advertisers.

A lot has been written about Facebook moving away from being a social media platform to being an advertising medium.

Over the past few years, Facebook has steadily modified its algorithm to gradually shrink organic reach of posts on business pages down to a trickle, the last 2014 figures show the average post with around 2.6% reach.  The goal of course is to coerce business into buying Facebook ads, something Facebook had not been very successful at in the past.  Obviously the new approach is working since Facebook showed $12.47 Billions in revenue for 2014.

In an effort to sweeten the deal and make friend with advertisers Facebook quietly deployed a new feature collapsing and further hiding users’ comments at the bottom left of the business page where few users will find them and if they do find them, they will only see a few posts unless they click on a non descriptive icon that is if they know where to look for Continue reading

Disclosure Is The Key

us-federal-trade-commission-logoRecently an advertising agency learned a hard lesson about social media promotion: Disclosure is the key.

The FTC recently settled with Interpublic’s Deutsch LA advertising agency and  Sony over claims the companies engaged in deceptive marketing during the launch of Sony’s hand held PlayStation Vita gaming console.

The lesson should not be lost on any marketer.

According to the complaint, one of the agency’s assistant account executives sent an email asking the agency’s staff to help promote the PlayStation Vita ad campaign by posting positive comments about the console on Twitter using the hashtag #gamechanger.

Deutsch LA employees posted tweets promoting PlayStation Vita without disclosing their connection to the agency or Sony.

According to the FTC these tweets were misleading because they didn’t reflect the views of actual consumers-users.

Agencies have to exercise a lot of caution when talking about a client’s work on social media, though best practices in that area aren’t always well codified, said David Berkowitz, chief marketing officer at digital agency MRY.

“This will be a wake-up call for agencies in terms of how they communicate work they have in market and what they encourage employees to do,” Mr. Berkowitz said.

It’s not the first time the FTC intervenes against agencies for deceptive marketing and it’s not likely to be the last and they will not stop at tweets.

The FTC is clear o that matter (and further clarified recently), marketers when they post on social media must disclose and consideration whether financial or in products and must disclose their connection to the agency, client or marketer.
What that means is that the poster must disclose if they work for the agency or the brand, they must disclosed if they have been paid or received free products or have received the service for free as a consideration to write and post about the product or service

In social media more than any other form of PR or advertising transparency is the key to keeping regulators at bay, to ensure brand integrity and to keep consumers trust.